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Author: zeteticus

Philosophy and depth psychology fanatic; writer and resident soul spelunker
Ochema

Ochema

  Soul-making does imply a metaphysical fantasy, and the implied metaphysics of archetypal psychology are best found in The Dream and the Underworld (Hillman 1979a), which elaborates the relations between psyche and death. There the dream is taken as the paradigm of the psyche – where the psyche presents itself encompassing the ego and engaged in its own work (dream-work). From the dream, one may assume that the psyche is fundamentally concerned with its imaginings and only secondarily concerned with…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 10

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 10

  But on the fourth night I cried, “To journey to Hell means to become Hell oneself. It is all frightfully muddled and interwoven. On this desert path there is not just glowing sand, but also horrible tangled invisible beings who live in the desert. I didn’t know this. The way is only apparently clear, the desert is only apparently empty. It seems inhabited by magical beings who murderously attach themselves to me and daimonically change my form. I have…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 9

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 9

  Blood shone at me from the red light of the crystal, and when I picked it up to discover its mystery; there lay the horror uncovered before me: in the depths of what is to come lay murder. The blond hero lay slain. The black beetle is the death that is necessary for renewal; and so thereafter, a new sun glowed, the sun of the depths, full of riddles, a sun of the night. And as the rising sun…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 8

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 8

I see a gray rock face along which I sink into great depths. I stand in black dirt up to my ankles in a dark cave. Shadows sweep over me. I am seized by fear, but I know I must go in. I crawl through a narrow crack in the rock and reach an inner cave whose bottom is covered with black water. But beyond this I catch a glimpse of a luminous red stone which I must reach. I…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 7

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 7

Sixth night. My soul leads me into the desert, into the desert of my own self. I did not think that my soul is a desert, a barren, hot desert, dusty and without drink. The journey leads through hot sand, slowly wading without a visible goal to hope for? How eerie is this wasteland. It seems to me that the way leads so far away from mankind. I take my way step by step, and do not know how long…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 6

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 6

You dread the depths; it should horrify you, since the way of what is to come leads through it. You must endure the temptation of fear and doubt, and at the same time acknowledge to the bone that your fear is justified and your doubt is reasonable. How otherwise / could it be a true temptation and a true overcoming? Christ totally overcomes the temptation of the devil, but not the temptation of God to good and reason. Christ thus…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 5

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 5

I know too much not to see on what swaying bridges I go. Where are you leading me?1   In human history, there are some who stand out from the masses. These are usually the ones who have made the journey C.G. Jung is about to make. With soul leading the way, striding “like a God,”2 Jung apprehensively follows, fearing he is being led downward into madness and meaninglessness. He says, “I limp after you on crutches of understanding. ….

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 4

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 4

  Jung begins to affirm the importance of living one’s individual life. Those who attempt to live by the example of another always fall into error. One must take up one’s cross daily and live one’s own life, for this is the way of salvation. Jung writes: . . .who knows the way to the eternally fruitful climes of the soul? You seek the way through mere appearances, you study books and give ear to all kinds of opinion. What…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 3

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 3

  The supreme meaning is the path, the way and the bridge to what is to come. That is the God yet to come. It is not the coming God himself but his image which appears in the supreme meaning. God is an image, and those who worship him must worship him in the images of the supreme meaning.1 Sonu Shamdasani points out the following in the notes: In Transformations and Symbols of the Libido (1912), Jung interpreted God as…

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On Jung’s Red Book, Part 2

On Jung’s Red Book, Part 2

  Personality #1, “the spirit of this time,” in Jung’s autobiography correlates to the normal, everyday personality; personality #2, or “the spirit of the depths,” is analogous to that part of him that is in contact with the depths of the unconscious. This is the way it is with all of us. Some of us ignore #2. The only contact we have with it is in our dreams. Only through interaction with the spirit of the depths can one come…

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