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The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 4

The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 4

Imagination is the power of prehension; without it, man would be an imbecile, without memory, without forethought, without power of interpreting what he sees and feels. The higher the form of life, the greater its power of prehension; and in man, prehension becomes a conscious faculty, which can be labelled imagination.1 I can’t tear myself away from this quote from Colin Wilson! It is so fertile, so alive with meaning, so full of power in the Nietzschean sense that I…

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The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 2

The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 2

Whitehead’s formulation of prehension could be one of the most important discoveries ever made by a human being, for it has the potential to totally transform mankind into what Nietzsche called Übermenschen. These are the ones who are neither masters nor slaves, who are adepts at self-discipline and self-realization, who do not lord it over their fellow humans, but bring wisdom and peace to the earth. This is what humanity may look like in the next stage of human evolution….

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The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 1

The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 1

  My heroes are not the typical ones, the movie stars, sports stars, musical stars, et al. Rather, they are philosophers, writers, poets, thinkers who can all be grouped under the rubric of Outsider, to borrow from Colin Wilson. My heroes are all Outsiders. People such as Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Goethe, and more recently Sylvia Plath, James Hillman, Colin Wilson, and Gary Lachman. These are the kinds of individuals I respect and admire most. No, they are not sports heroes, racing…

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Religion and the Rebel, Conclusion

Religion and the Rebel, Conclusion

  Wilson now turns to Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947), perhaps the greatest intellectual of his era. Time will tell if he will be recognized as the greatest thinker of the twentieth century. The sublimity of his thought is unsurpassed for his day and time. The only one that comes close, perhaps, is C.G. Jung. Wilson has a high regard for Whitehead, mostly because Whitehead began his career as the “typical abstract philosopher.” He “gradually rejected ‘abstractionism’ until he became one…

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