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Colin Wilson on Rudolf Steiner Part 2

Colin Wilson on Rudolf Steiner Part 2

At this point, I have read through chapter three of Wilson’s book. So far, aside from Thought, Inspiration, and Intuition, there has been no real mention of how Steiner believed we could cross the threshold and the enter the realm of Imagination. He has spent his time, so far, on a biographical sketch, which is certainly important. Wilson is tracing Steiner’s intellectual development. There was a brief description of Steiner attending the lectures of Franz Brentano. According to Wilson, the…

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Colin Wilson on Rudolf Steiner Part 1

Colin Wilson on Rudolf Steiner Part 1

I’ve had a copy of Colin Wilson’s little book on Rudolf Steiner sitting in one of my bookcases for over a year now, so I thought it might be a good time to blow off the dust and look inside. In his early works, Wilson didn’t really care for Steiner. He didn’t write anything about him ( that I know of ) until the 1980s, long after he had developed his “New Existentialism.” He does admit finding him “an interesting…

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Rudolf Steiner and Imagination

Rudolf Steiner and Imagination

As a prerequisite to better understanding Steiner, at least for myself, I begin with this amazing quote: . . . the sense-perceptible world is only part of what surrounds us. It is distinct from, and to a certain extent independent of, our overall surroundings simply because it can be perceived with senses that disregard the soul and spiritual aspects of these surroundings. It is like a piece of ice floating on water—the ice consists of the same substance as the…

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The Romantic Poets: What They Missed

The Romantic Poets: What They Missed

Even though they did not complete the work, the Romantic poets brought about great advancement in the consciousness of Imagination. The poets (except for William Blake, perhaps) fell short of grasping the conclusions of what they were experiencing. One could point to Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as an example. In his Biographia Literaria, Chapter 13, he begins to explain the philosophical nature of Imagination, only to be interrupted by a letter from a friend, whom he felt deserved his attention more…

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The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 4

The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 4

Imagination is the power of prehension; without it, man would be an imbecile, without memory, without forethought, without power of interpreting what he sees and feels. The higher the form of life, the greater its power of prehension; and in man, prehension becomes a conscious faculty, which can be labelled imagination.1 I can’t tear myself away from this quote from Colin Wilson! It is so fertile, so alive with meaning, so full of power in the Nietzschean sense that I…

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The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 2

The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 2

Whitehead’s formulation of prehension could be one of the most important discoveries ever made by a human being, for it has the potential to totally transform mankind into what Nietzsche called Übermenschen. These are the ones who are neither masters nor slaves, who are adepts at self-discipline and self-realization, who do not lord it over their fellow humans, but bring wisdom and peace to the earth. This is what humanity may look like in the next stage of human evolution….

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Hermetic Intelligence

Hermetic Intelligence

…the great advantage of Mercurial intelligence is its power to keep the soul in motion, spiraling down toward a vortex of significance. Mercury keeps the carousel of interpretation moving, feeding wonder and curiosity instead of granting the stupor of final conquest (Moore 153). The primary way the soul is deepened is through imagination. When we have new ideas about something we’re thinking about metaphorically, such as how a spiral exemplifies the movement of the soul, or how snowflakes are perfect…

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Ciphers of Nature

Ciphers of Nature

Photo by Pauk …initial imaginative operation is to typify (tamthll) the immaterial and spiritual realties  in  external or sensuous  forms,  which  then  become  “ciphers”  for  what they manifest. After that the Imagination remains the motive force of the ta’wil which is  the continuous ascent of the soul In short, because there is imagination there is  ta ‘wll; because there is  ta ‘wll,  there is symbolism;  and because there is symbolism, beings have two dimensions (Alone with the Alone, by Henry…

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Henry Corbin and the Archetypal Realm

Henry Corbin and the Archetypal Realm

Nicholas Roerich “Song of Shambhala” The active Imagination is the preeminent mirror, the epiphanic place of the Images of the archetypal world; that is why the theory of the mundus imaginalis is bound up with a theory of imaginative knowledge and imaginative function–a function truly central and mediatory, because of the median and mediatory position of the mundus imaginalis. It is a function that permits all the universes to symbolize with one another (or exist in symbolic relationship with one…

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