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Category: archetypal

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: The Tree on the Mountainside, Part 2

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: The Tree on the Mountainside, Part 2

This continues my previous article on Nietzsche’s section in Thus Spoke Zarathustra called the The Tree on the Mountainside. The young man is learning what it will take to achieve excellence as a human being. He is inventing his soul, building it up like one builds an elaborate castle. He has learned that mundane things, everydayness, as Heidegger calls it, will never satisfy his thirst for life. Mediocrity is not the path to the Übermensch. Zarathustra smiled and said: “Some souls…

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Thus Spoke Zarathustra: The Tree on the Mountainside, Part 1

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: The Tree on the Mountainside, Part 1

Zarathustra’s eyes had discerned that a young man avoided him. As he walked one evening alone through the mountains surrounding the town, which is called The Motley Cow, behold, there while walking he found this young man leaning against a tree, gazing wearily into the valley.1 This section of Thus Spoke Zarathustra, called On the Tree on the Mountain, speaks primarily to the ones Colin Wilson calls “outsiders.” It speaks to those lonely souls who are obsessed with striving, with…

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Down to the Mothers

Down to the Mothers

Follow it down, ‘twil lead you to the Mothers. -Mephistopheles, from Goethe’s Faust, Part II In Goethe’s mysterious tale of Faust, there is a very interesting scene which relates to the discussion of Husserlian phenomenology. Faust, Part II, Act I,  takes place in a dark gallery. Faust and Mephistopheles converse in private concerning Faust’s promise to the emperor to bring forth Paris and Helen in apparitional form: Faust. The Emperor orders— straightway must it be— Both Helena and Paris will…

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Rudolf Steiner, Spiritual Monist

Rudolf Steiner, Spiritual Monist

I’ve known of Rudolf Steiner since about 1993. My brother had acquired a copy of An Outline of Occult Science around that time. After perusing through it, I knew I had to buy it for myself. I had been reading C.G. Jung for about two years at the time. The book proved very difficult, especially for one so new to this type of thinking. But, somehow, I knew there were important ideas contained therein. Since then, I’ve read several of…

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Freedom and Phenomenology

Freedom and Phenomenology

. . . our normal waking consciousness, rational consciousness as we call it, is but one special type of consciousness, whilst all about it, parted from it by the flimsiest of screens, there lie potential forms of consciousness entirely different.1 William James, the great American psychologist and philosopher, joined many thinkers during the early part of the twentieth century in declaring that we are in close proximity to amazing powers of consciousness that have become cloaked from “normal” consciousness, partly…

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Back to Beyond: Hillman and Whitehead, Part 2

Back to Beyond: Hillman and Whitehead, Part 2

In section III of Hillman’s essay, entitled Psychological Cosmology, he begins to discuss how Whitehead’s cosmological  ideas could have relevance to archetypal psychology. He starts by discussing the word itself: The word cosmology refers to the astronomical order of the heavenly bodies, and it also has a metaphysical meaning, according to Whitehead’s Process and Reality (whose subtitle is An Essay in Cosmology): a scheme “of general ideas in terms of which every element of our experience can be interpreted” (PR…

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Back to Beyond: Hillman and Whitehead, Part 1

Back to Beyond: Hillman and Whitehead, Part 1

In 1983, a conference was organized by the Center for Process Studies, and held at Claremont University Center and Graduate School with the theme of a dialogue between process theologians and the thought of James Hillman and Carl Jung. A book of essays based on this dialogue was a result and was published as Archetypal Process: Self and Divine in Whitehead, Jung, and Hillman. In this article, I would like to examine some of the thinking of James Hillman’s essay,…

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The Outsider’s Guide to Whitehead’s Philosophy, Conclusion

The Outsider’s Guide to Whitehead’s Philosophy, Conclusion

This article will conclude my short series on Whitehead’s relevance to the Outsider. I have attempted to show a few of the great man’s ideas which were important to Colin Wilson’s thinking regarding the Outsider’s problem. The two most important of these are prehension, and Whitehead’s solution to the conundrum of human perception, the latter of which confounded philosophers since Descartes’ cogito. Whitehead, along with Edmund Husserl, are important to Wilson in that they “overturned the foundations of western philosophy,…

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The Outsider’s Guide to Whitehead’s Philosophy, Part 5

The Outsider’s Guide to Whitehead’s Philosophy, Part 5

Many academic philosophers don’t care for Colin Wilson’s thinking. They seem to desire remaining mired in either logical positivism, linguistic analysis, or other topics that do not bring us to the crux of who we are as human beings. I always appreciate any thinker who seeks to bring out the best in mankind. God knows we have seen enough of the worst. I read a blog post a few days ago by Dr. Sam Mickey, an adjunct professor at the…

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The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 4

The Outsider’s Guide to the Philosophy of Whitehead, Part 4

Imagination is the power of prehension; without it, man would be an imbecile, without memory, without forethought, without power of interpreting what he sees and feels. The higher the form of life, the greater its power of prehension; and in man, prehension becomes a conscious faculty, which can be labelled imagination.1 I can’t tear myself away from this quote from Colin Wilson! It is so fertile, so alive with meaning, so full of power in the Nietzschean sense that I…

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