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Month: June 2017

The Land of Nowhere

The Land of Nowhere

For those of you who are not familiar with the term, mundus imaginalis, please see my article, Henry Corbin and the Archetypal Realm. According to French philosopher and theologian, Henry Corbin, one of the best descriptions in Western thinking of what he calls the mundus imaginalis is given by the Swedish mystic, Emanuel Swedenborg. Corbin says, “One cannot but be struck by the concordance or convergence of the statements by the great Swedish visionary with those of Sohravardi, Ibn ‘Arabi,…

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The Coming Age of Imagination

The Coming Age of Imagination

The imagination is not a state: it is the human existence itself. -William Blake There will come a day when mankind will dwell in the world of the imagination. It may not come soon. It may not come to our particular human species, but it will indeed come. I once thought of the imagination as things I could visualize in my mind’s eye. It is much more than that. I once believed if I, through my imagination, could come up…

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The Anima Mundi in Matter

The Anima Mundi in Matter

In my last post, I quoted a paragraph from Jung commenting on Gerhard Dorn’s alchemical philosophy. In it, he uses a very curious phrase. Here is the relevant section: …the caelum also signifies man’s likeness to God (imago Dei), the anima mundi in matter, and the truth itself (Jung 539). According to Jung, the caelum is the Philosopher’s Stone, but it is also the anima mundi in matter. Caelum is the blue sky above us, the vault of heaven, and also…

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Gerhard Dorn and the The Caelum

Gerhard Dorn and the The Caelum

  Aurum nostrum non est aurum vulgi. -Gerhard Dorn Gerhard Dorn was a Belgian alchemist who lived in the sixteenth century. Detailed facts concerning his life have been lost. We know he lived in Mechelen, in the province of Antwerp, from about 1530 until the 1580’s. He began publishing books around 1565 when he wrote his Chymisticum artificium. Working with Adam von Bodenstein, with whom he studied, Dorn was instrumental in the recovery, translation into Latin, and publishing of Paracelsus’…

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Completing the Work of Creation

Completing the Work of Creation

Author, Gary Lachman, writes: I believe that nature, the world, the cosmos, separated us off from itself in order for it to become conscious of itself through us (Lachman, Caretakers 302) This idea deeply resonates with me. Because I wholeheartedly agree with James Hillman’s teaching of the pathologization of the soul,  it is really the only answer to the question as to why human consciousness has drifted so far away from Nature. As I wrote back in February in an…

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The Soul of the Genius

The Soul of the Genius

How does the so-called genius receives inspiration? Take the case of Michelangelo, who was very familiar with Marsilio Ficino’s philosophy, which is Soul-centric. Although Michelangelo  kept his carving technique a well-guarded secret, he did make several statements that hint at his methodology. I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free. Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it. The marble not yet…

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Communication with the Unconscious

Communication with the Unconscious

In my last post, I left off with these questions: Does communication with the unconscious mind come via the right hemisphere of the brain, which is then re-presented to the conscious mind by the left hemisphere? One of the most successful periods in human history, at least in terms of the right hemisphere of the brain operating in its proper role as “master,” as McGilchrist calls it, was the period of Western history we know as the Renaissance. During this…

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The Right Brain as Master

The Right Brain as Master

In Iain McGilchrist’s stupendous work, The Master and his Emissary, the author argues that the right and left hemispheres perform similar functions, but in very different ways. McGilchrist contends that the right brain is the superior of the two, hence the name of the book. The subtitle of his book is, The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World. First of all, I personally do not accept the idea that we think only because we have a brain….

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