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Year: 2007

Meaning Of Life Part VI

Meaning Of Life Part VI

In the case of the death of one individual symbol through consciousness’s transition from an exoteric to an esoteric standpoint toward it, it may well be that this loss is compensated for by the emergence of a new symbol pregnant with a different meaning so that there is a new fascination. This is what had in fact happened in history many times; there have been numerous periods of cultural crisis when the old gods or symbols had lost their conviction…

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Meaning Of Life Part V

Meaning Of Life Part V

Clearly, man’s embeddedness in nature is over. But since the meaning of “meaning” is nothing else but in-ness, it is obvious why the last two centuries had a sense of alienation and nihilism. As Jung stated, to experience a loss of meaning, the “soul has become lonely; it is extra ecclesiam and in a state of no salvation.” The soul is likewise extra naturam. With this insight we have returned in our discussion to, and provided an underpinning for, Jung’s…

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Meaning Of Life Part IV

Meaning Of Life Part IV

The search for meaning, according to Giegerich, is self-contradictory: The search for meaning is in truth, but secretly, the longing for a state of in-ness, but since the question about the worth and meaning of life has existence as a whole in its field of vision, it inevitably positions us outside and vis-a-vis life. The search for meaning unwittingly has to construe that which it desires to be the logic or syntax of life as a semantic content, as a…

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Meaning Of Life Part III

Meaning Of Life Part III

In this third installment of commentary on Giegerich’s fascinating essay, The End of Meaning and the Birth of Man, I will discuss Giegerich’s contention that, prior to the nineteenth century, mankind was in no position to question life’s meaning. The nineteenth century brought a shift in being that placed man in a position to view life as if from outside life. …existence as such had become a vis-a-vis, as it were, which is the opposite of in-ness. Man now for…

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Meaning Of Life Part II

Meaning Of Life Part II

Giegerich claims that myth, religion, and metaphysics were never explicit answers to the question, “What is the meaning of life?” Rather, he says they were merely the concrete articulation or formulation, in imaginal form, and, in the case of metaphysics, the explication, in the mode of thought, of the form of the factually existing in-ness in, or groundedness of, existence at each historical locus respectively. The tales of myth, the religious practices, doctrines, or dogmas, the elaborate systems of metaphysics,…

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Meaning Of Life Part I

Meaning Of Life Part I

As time permits, I will begin posting comments on an essay by Wolfgang Giegerich called The End Of Meaning And The Birth Of Man. Giegerich is a German Jungian analyst. The following short bio is from his book, The Soul’s Logical Life: After university studies in the field of literature in Germany and the United States and an assistant professorship at Rutgers University (New Brunswick, N.J.), Wolfgang Giegerich trained in analytical psychology at the C.G. Jung Institute in Stuttgart, Germany….

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The Giegerich Project

The Giegerich Project

I am going to begin a new project on this blog. We’ll see how it goes. This is a new author for me. I am very unfamiliar with his work. I know that he is an archetypal psychologist and has been very influential in that field. As time permits, I will begin posting comments on an essay by Wolfgang Giegerich called The End Of Meaning And The Birth Of Man. Giegerich is a German Jungian analyst. The following short bio…

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Comments On Faust Part XX

Comments On Faust Part XX

  This article will discuss Faust’s belief or disbelief in God. In the scene called Marthe’s Garden, Margarete begins to question Faust about his views on religion: Margarete: Tell me, dear, in what do you believe? Although you are a good and loveworthy man, religion means little to you, that I know. Faust: Let that be, my child! You feel my love, is it not true? For those I love, I’d lay my life down too; I would rob no…

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Comments On Faust Part XIX

Comments On Faust Part XIX

Recently, I’ve been thinking about what I have in common with Faust. No, I am not a distinguished doctor of learning, nor do I come from a family where the emphasis is on scholarship, but I have sought answers to the puzzling questions of the universe and my own existence. The result was I found myself scratching my head in utter dismay. During the 1980’s, I read book after book in an attempt to discover what my purpose was in…

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Comments On Faust Part XVIII

Comments On Faust Part XVIII

This article continues the comparison of Faust with Zarathustra’s metaphor of the child. The child is a new beginning, a creative fire. When long-held beliefs have been called into question by the camel, and then destroyed by the lion, one enters a new epoch. After a time, the values one has created for oneself become obsolete. These must not be allowed to become sacred cows, for, eventually, they must be destroyed and replaced by new values. The spirit of the…

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